How to Top-Coat, Outline, and Flood Cookies

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  • Published on:  Saturday, October 5, 2013
  • Ready to express your inner cookie artist? Well then, you're in the right place! Welcome to Lesson 6 of "Julia M. Usher's Ultimate Cookie Decorating Series"!

    NOTE: This video is one of 16 videos originally filmed for my DVD series, which was discontinued in November 2014. Select videos from the series will be released to YouTube over time, but my app will remain the only place where you can find all of the original DVD videos. To learn more about my app, click here: http://www.papertrell.com/apps/Julia_Ushers_Ultimate_Cookies

    Top-coating a cookie so that it's perfectly smooth and bubble-free is often easier said than done. In this video, I share my tips for achieving consistently smooth top coats, and explain when it makes sense to top-coat versus outline and flood. As extra gifts, I reveal a trick that prevents cratering in small, flooded spaces and step-by-step instructions for the needlepoint technique - essentially outlining and flooding taken to the extreme!

    IF YOU LIKE THIS VIDEO, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe to my channel. It is only through your support that I can afford to make more videos. THANK YOU!

    RELATED LINKS:
    How to Make and Handle Parchment Cones video: https://cnclips.net/video/XRkwFJv0olY/video.html
    Royal Icing and Consistency Adjustments tutorial: http://www.juliausher.com/kitchen_and_studio/recipe/royal_icing
    Gingerbread Cookie recipe: http://www.juliausher.com/blog/more/cutout_cookie_gingerbread

    NOTES ON STORING LEFTOVER ICING:
    First, I prefer to use icing on the day the color is mixed, as, for whatever reason, the color seems to set more stably (without spotting or mottling) if it hasn't sat too long or been stored overnight in the refrigerator. That said, I typically only make as much icing as I plan to use, so there is little waste. HOWEVER, if you end up with lots left over or feel compelled to make your icing in advance, and so must store it, then cover the surface flush with plastic wrap (to keep the icing from crusting) and then foil and store in the fridge. It should be fine there for a few days, though some separation may occur. Simply bring the icing to room temperature and re-beat it before use to restore its original consistency. You may find that the icing has dehydrated a bit, so you may also need to add a touch of water. Some people freeze their icing with success, but for all of the reasons noted above, I do not freeze mine.

    CREDITS:
    Video by: Joe Baran, http://www.workingmansfilm.com/

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