The problem with video gambling machines

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  • Published on:  Thursday, January 17, 2019
  • What happened when Illinois legalized machines known as “the crack cocaine of gambling”.

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    For more in-depth reporting, check out ProPublica Illinois’ feature piece on video gambling: https://features.propublica.org/the-bad-bet/how-illinois-bet-on-video-gambling-and-lost/ And if you want more of their articles, you can sign up for their newsletter here: https://go.propublica.org/ppil-vox

    Do you know someone struggling with video gambling? Help ProPublica understand video slots and poker addiction in Illinois: https://www.propublica.org/getinvolved/help-us-investigate-illinois-video-gambling-addiction

    Nearly a decade ago, Illinois lawmakers legalized video gambling. They hoped that the machines, which offered up electronic versions of games like slots or poker, would generate billions of dollars of revenue for the state. So they passed a bill quickly, with little debate, to expand the industry dramatically. Illinois now has more than 30,000 of these machines, and more locations to legally place a bet than Nevada.

    A ProPublica Illinois investigation has found that the expansion of video gambling hasn’t pulled Illinois out of debt — it’s actually accelerated it. While people in Illinois have gambled a lot more on machines that can be highly addictive, most of the additional money has ended up in the hands of a small group of companies behind video gambling.

    Watch the video above to find out what this could mean for the states and cities across the country considering gambling expansions.

    Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing.
    Previous headline: Video gambling: Not a great way to fund a government

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Comment

  • That_Seagull
    That_Seagull  7 days ago

    I've never lost money on them personally. Last two times, won 400 and 900$ respectively.

  • Diego Kiwi
    Diego Kiwi  1 months ago

    Woah my state beat another state!

  • Brandon Stennett
    Brandon Stennett  1 months ago

    Hey ,favor could you guys explain the NO BAIL SWEDEN SITUATION ? would help us ASAP.

  • Cassius Redgun
    Cassius Redgun  2 months ago

    Alberta has VLT's everywhere

  • Richard W
    Richard W  3 months ago

    Don’t play a video poker machine unless it’s a 9/6 payout. It means you get 9 for 1 on a full house and 6 for 1 for a flush. If you play a machine with a lower payout than that you are being robbed.

  • Tuho
    Tuho  3 months ago

    Mobile games are the worst video game gambling.

  • しすい
    しすい  4 months ago

    who didnt know this already

  • Ghn Bdb
    Ghn Bdb  4 months ago

    Make a video on how to become a vox intern pls

  • Psychic Lexington
    Psychic Lexington  4 months ago

    The only problem is you aren't on Bovada!!! You should visit www.Bovada.world for $250 in FREE MONEY when you sign up!

  • Battlefront 2 Style
    Battlefront 2 Style  4 months ago

    Don't forget Indian casinos.

  • Moo Cow
    Moo Cow  5 months ago

    These horrid things are new in the US?

  • Gonzalo F
    Gonzalo F  5 months ago +1

    I was very surprised to find that gambling is so restricted in the USA, a country known as an example of freedom. In Spain you can find gambling machines at lots of bars, but they are strictly regulated, for example each of them has a sticker saying how much money does the machine pay back (for example, 85%). Here, game addiction has increased recently, because of an economic crisis we have just left. It's sad to see how popular have became bet houses and casinos, specially in the poorest neighborhoods, where you can see people spending more than they can afford.
    I'm really not sure whether or not the government (of any country)should prohibit this kind of business, restricting it's citizens freedom in order to protect them from their own weakness.

  • aryaaa 19197
    aryaaa 19197  5 months ago

    Dare I say, I like the voice of this narrator

  • Simon Carter
    Simon Carter  5 months ago

    You’ve disabled your comments of some videos to deny your platform as hate speech. This only proves the theory that freedom of speech is a poison, topics that are controversial are enforced on channels like this and similar to it because it is popular at the time and those who oppose are discredited. This restricts all freedom of speech. This proves freedom of speech as a poison to humanity.

  • St. Batu
    St. Batu  5 months ago

    Observed pattern: an American outlet criticizes an American institution or official (opinion, room for improvement...) then some ignorant foreigners see it as an opportunity for 'America bad' comments.
    The irony is most of these kids are from some really backward places where you can't even be critical of the government or officials. It's like the case of a poor homeless person laughing at the rich person for only having two mansions.

  • Juosta
    Juosta  5 months ago

    Living in Illinois, I thought the fact that most bars and restaurants haing video slots was just a normal, nationwide thing. It makes sense that it's a lot herder to find bars that don't have slots compared to Wisconsin

  • Michael Dawson
    Michael Dawson  6 months ago

    These vlts are at almost every small bar in canada

  • ASMR touch
    ASMR touch  6 months ago

    John Oliver profiled a woman who would use her family's grocery money on these machines. She was heartbreaking to watch.

  • sour doe
    sour doe  6 months ago

    I've been playing slots for a while but recently quit cause I finally won it all back and I have to say digital or reel slots can have the same odds. Digital just has more potential to be fun and addictive so of course that's where everyone goes. Digital slots these days more often play like video games, especially the style of Konami's slots or even slots with progression aspects. Everything about them is intended to be addictive, from the lights and colors used to the gameplay. Add a comfy seat and you'll want to sit there forever and get lost in the game. Wouldn't be surprised if psychologists were involved with the making of some. Everyone I'm sure knows the odds and knows this but they chose to anyways which I'm sure was for more than just a chance at winning, It's a great distraction with more thrills and real money used all the time. Mine it all started with putting a 20 into a flashy machine, hitting some button, and getting lucky then wanting to go back again for multiple reasons. If it was just say walking up to a booth, giving someone the money, and seeing I won anything after I never would have. It was the fun and way it looked that initially drew me in and the comfort of the casino. But everyone has a choice, it should be legal because no one forced you to start in the first place and the chances of hitting a life changing jackpot are extremely slim. 3 years of it and I've only been up $600 at most across more spins and bet ranges than I can recall right now. But all it takes is sitting down at the right time and spinning once, then you have over a thousand instantly plus taxes.

  • Dave Davidson
    Dave Davidson  6 months ago

    Both traditional and electronic slots are programmed to pay out a set amount per x amount of money. In the UK these are set by law and are often in the 70-90% range. You could easily have a much higher chance of winning on an electronic slot due to these settings. You didnt make that clear at all and seemed to misunderstand how payouts on electronic slots work.